Humanitarian Advancement Through Technology June 1 - 4 th, 2014
IEEE

Keynote Speakers and Panelists

Keynote Speakers

Keynote D1.2: Ubiquitous-Healthcare Smart Homes for the Elderly

 

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Keynote Speaker: Professor M. Jamal Deen

PhD DEng-hc Dr-hc FRSC FCAE FIEEE FAPS

Senior Canada Research Chair in Information Technology Director, Micro- and Nano-Systems Laboratory

Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, ITB 104

Abstract

Currently, smart medical homes are attracting much attention from both researchers at universities as well as at medical centers. However, because of some limitations in specific areas – cost, performance or reliability that include ultra-low power sensors and actuators; ultra-low-power integrated circuits for signal conditioning and processing, transceivers and memory; energy efficient and agile network systems; data fusion and “intelligent” decision making, its penetration has not been as high as forcasted. At present, two key factors are stimulating the development of more complete and cost-effective solutions. First is the significant increase in the world’s aging population. And second is the health care providers’ willingness to reduce costs by treating elderly patients through novel approaches. One such attractive approach is to have the elderly in their homes rather than within costly specialized hospitals or institutions.

In our work, we are using some key advances in information technology, wireless communication, web-based technologies and autonomics, to develop new, smart and cost-effective solutions for the health wellness of the elderly. Such a solution would enable elderly to lead independent lifestyles in their own homes while being non-invasively and non-intrusively monitored. This specific type of monitoring will allow for the early detection of symptoms, so diseases can be treated earlier than in later stages. It will help to promote health wellness; as well as to treat chronic illnesses. Also, through a few examples, we will discuss our ongoing research and the challenges we have uncovered. We will also describe some of the research issues we are pursuing. In particular, we will focus on the critical role of information and communications technologies (ICT) and computing in developing innovative, low-cost and high-impacting solutions. These ICT and computing solutions will help address the pending elderly demographic crisis. Several examples including an age-based walking pattern analyzer, a smart sleep environment system, and on-body sensors, will be described to highlight ICT and Computing for Ubiquitous-Healthcare.

Biography

M. Jamal Deen (FIEEE) is Canada Research Chair in Information Technology, Professor of ECE and Professor of Biomedical Engineering at McMaster University. He completed his Ph.D. at Case Western Reserve University where he was both a Fulbright-LASPAU Scholar and an American Vacuum Society Scholar. His doctoral work on dynamic temperature measurements and combustion optimization in rocket and jet engines was sponsored and used by NASA, Cleveland, USA.

Dr. Deen is regarded as the world’s foremost authority in modeling and noise of electronic and optoelectronic devices. He has successfully transferred powerful engineering and circuit models for high-performance semiconductor devices to several companies. His practical models and experimental innovations for reliability prediction have contributed significantly to the design and manufacture of reliable high-performance photodetectors. Dr. Deen’s research record includes more than 480 peer-reviewed articles and six patents that have been used in industry. He is the author/editor of 20 books and conference proceedings, the textbook Silicon Photonics – Fundamentals and Devices, 16 invited book chapters, and has received 12 best paper/poster awards. Over his career, he has won more than fifty awards and honors.

Dr. Deen’s peers have elected him to Fellow status in nine national academies and professional organizations, including The Royal Society of Canada (RSC), The American Physical Society and The Electrochemical Society.  His other awards and honors include the Callinan Award and the Electronics and Photonics Award from the Electrochemical Society; the Research Award from the Humboldt Foundation; the Eadie Medal from RSC; the McNaughton Medal and the Fessenden Medal from IEEE Canada; and three honorary doctorates from University of Waterloo, Canada, Universidad de Granada, Spain and Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spain.

Keynote D2.2: Ethics in Innovation

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Keynote Speaker: Christopher Fabian

Snr Advisor on Innovation to the Exec. Director at UNICEF

Christopher Fabian (@unickf) co-created and has co-lead UNICEF’s Innovation Unit in New York since 2007. 

Biography: Working with UNICEF’s 135 country offices, the Innovation Unit’s research and development priorities focus on near-term challenges in the world’s most difficult operating environments. The Unit also crafts strategic options for innovation on a three-to-five year horizon. The Unit’s accomplishments have garnered global recognition, notably: Top 50 Innovations of 2011 from Time Magazine, and, in 2012, gold and silver IDSA awards, and a Redhat prize for being one of the three top open source projects. 

Christopher believes that technology is not the end-product of innovation, but a principal driver of new ways of thinking about development problems. The Unit’s commitment to open-source engagements, determination to learn from failure, and realization that local talent must be front-and-center in creating successful local solutions has positioned UNICEF as a global leader in innovation for development.

Christopher is most proud of his work identifying, mentoring and promoting local leaders, designers and innovators around the world. Convinced that global, authentic, and humble engagement among academia, the private sector and civil society can, together, leverage technology-driven innovation for development, he has co-created and taught the “Design for UNICEF” course at New York University with Clay Shirky. Christopher has taught and lectured at Columbia University, Harvard University and IIT Delhi. 

Prior to joining UNICEF in 2006, Christopher taught in Lebanon and launched start-ups in East Africa and Egypt. He holds degrees in Philosophy from American University in Cairo, and in Media Studies from the New School in New York. In 2013, he was recognized as one of TIME Magazine’s 100 most influential people.

Keynote D3.2: Strengthening Safety Online

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Keynote Speaker: Anuradha Dugal

Biography:  Anu has been Director of Violence Prevention Programs at Canadian Women’s Foundation for 6 years and previous to that was a Board Member (2002 – 2007) and Chair of the Violence Prevention Committee. She is currently responsible for all national strategies related to violence against women and girls and teen violence prevention. This includes grant making, knowledge mobilization, program enhancement, convening and coalition building. Whenever possible, Anu spreads the word of the great work that the Foundation is doing through media opportunities such as op-eds, interviews and social media.

She has also worked in fundraising at the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University, and prior to that was Executive Director of the Quebec Chapter of Leave Out Violence from 2001 to 2005. Her first major achievement after becoming a Canadian citizen in 1999 was to join the team at the Fédération de femmes du Québec organizing the international coalition of women’s groups that made up the World March of Women. Before coming to Canada she was a high-school language teacher, specializing in girls’ education and working in the UK and Japan.

Anu is very involved in social issues (violence against women and girls, teen violence, gender equality, urban agriculture and sustainable development) and she sits on both the advisory group for ‘Making Women Count at Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and OAITH’s Community Advisory Committee for the Strategic Visioning Process. Anu is currently a part-time student at HEC Montreal, where she is perfecting business skills in leadership and project management. She is enjoys gardening, knitting, running and has just entered her first triathlon, where she placed in the top 30%!

TOWARDS HUMANITARIAN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

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Keynote speaker: Witold Kinsner

Abstract: Recent developments in mathematics, science, engineering and technology over the last several decades have made it possible to transform technology from machine-oriented (designed to increase productivity and quantification) to more human-centric (to simplify interaction with technology and improve the well-being of individuals). Technology is being positioned to move from a privilege to a social benefit. Such humanitarian technology (HT) can help at several levels, including: (i) natural disasters (such as fires, storms, tornadoes, tsunamis, earthquakes), (ii) humanitarian disasters (genocides, wars, non-democratic elections, injustice), (iii) developing countries (water, food, shelter, energy, sanitation, health, (iv) developed countries (the poor, seniors, teenagers, physical or mental disabilities). Since, at all these levels, information gathering and distribution is considered as important as water, food and medicines in disasters, it must be considered as an ecosystem. The development of a good HT has many scientific, engineering, technological and social challenges. One of the important challenges is education. How do we teach the new generation of humanitarian design engineers?

This talk describes examples of such activities in Manitoba as developed and delivered over the last decade. In order to expand experiential learning (EL), we have introduced many activities for both university and high-school students. The university EL includes multi-tier laboratories, industrial capstone projects, and complex design projects such as a wildlife conservation UAV and the T-Sat. The latter involved the design, implementation, and testing of a nano-satellite (T-Sat) with over 100 students from 16 departments and 5 faculties, as well as over 50 advisors from academia, industry, business, government and the amateur radio community. To attract the next generation of designers, outreach to high-school and primary-school students must also be conducted through hands-on activities, including workshops (e.g., electronics, microcontrollers, rockets, and robotics), high-altitude balloon launching, teaching-teacher workshops, summer space discovery camps, Indigenous high-school student exploratory camps, and direct mentorship.

Biography: Witold Kinsner is Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from McMaster University in 1974, and became Assistant Professor at McMaster University and then at McGill University. He is a co-founder of the first Microelectronics Centre in Canada, and was its Director of Research from 1979 to 1987. He is a Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada (FEIC), a Fellow of Engineers Canada (FEC), Life Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a member of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM), and a member of the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of the Province of Manitoba (APEGM). For over 40 years, he has been very active all the IEEE levels: Region 7 (IEEE Canada), Council, Section, Chapter, and Student Branch. In 2013, Dr Kinsner was elected 2014-2015 President Elect, IEEE Canada and 2014-2015 Director Elect (Region 7), IEEE Inc.

He has been involved in research on cognitive systems, computational intelligence, robust real-time computing engines, and computer memories. Applications included biomedical, industrial monitoring and controls, aerospace, and space. He has authored and co-authored over 720 publications in the above areas, as well as supervised 64 Master’s and Doctorate graduate students, 200 undergraduate final-year thesis/capstone project students, and mentored 32 summer research students.

 Keynote 2 D4.2: Smart cities related innovation to improve lives of underserved populations

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Keynote speaker: Dr. Yves Lostanlen

Biography:

Dr. Yves Lostanlen is currently President & CEO of SIRADEL North America and is based in Toronto, Canada. This high-tech company provides 3D geographical data, leading 3D propagation software and expertise to the Telecommunication Industry (Wireless, Smart city). Yves Lostanlen is also Adjunct Research Professor at University of Toronto (Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering). His recent scientific interests are on EMF exposure assessment, cost-efficient wireless deployment using big data, and new simulation techniques of physical phenomena.

Prof Yves Lostanlen has a personal interest in technologies (ICT4D) supporting global economic growth, sustainability and social development.
Born and raised in France, Yves was holds a Doctorate of Science (Habilitation)  in Physics, a PhD and an MSc in Electrical & Computer Engineering, and an Executive MBA from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT Sloan.

PRIVACY PANEL

Neil Schwartzman

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Neil Schwartzman has been involved in the fight against online abuse since 1994. He wrote the world’s first distributed spam filtering software.

He is the Executive Director of the Internet’s oldest end-use advocacy group, the Coalition Against Unsolicited Commercial Email (CAUCE.org). In this capacity, he is currently the Co-chair of the Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group’s (M3AAWG.org) Awards Committee (previously, he was the Vice-chair of the MAAWG.org Public Policy and Academic Committees), an founding member of the London Action Plan, representative to the Anti-phishing Working Group and the Stop Spam Alliance and represented end-user rights to the Anti-Spyware Coalition, and Canada’s Federal Ministerial Task Force on Spam.

Schwartzman won the first annual M3AAWG Mary Litynski Award for lifetime achievement in his work in anti-abuse.

He has participated working groups of the U.S. Federal Communications Committee’s ‘Communications Security, Reliability and Interoperability Council’ II and III.

Recently, he helped spearhead a yearlong external review of the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development’s Anti-spam Toolkit undertaken by the London Action Plan, MAAWG and CAUCE and presented the review committee’s findings to the OECD, in Paris, France.

Louis  Houle

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Graduate of Laval University, with post-graduate studies in public administration where he worked for almost 30 years mainly in project management,  Louis is now a senior advisor at IPSO-Québec Institute. IQI offers expertise in knowledge sharing (KS) within an organisation and between organizations. It focuses on IT best practices, integrated information and document management, and the use of open, flexible and scalable systems. KS offers a set of tools to improve acces to knowledge by emphasizing ITC capability.

Louis also serves for Connect Quebec since 2007, an organization that focuses on High Speed Internet development in Quebec regions facing Internet accessibility deficits. Training and knowledge transfer is provided to create expertise and new skills in the regions.

Louis is currently president of ISOC Quebec Chapter (Internet Society) whose mission is to promote the open development, evolution, and use of the Internet for the benefit of all people throughout the world.

Matt Broda

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Matt Broda is a Technical Fellow for Security at Bell Canada.  Matt is responsible for Bell’s strategic security programs direction focused on business markets.  He is a seasoned security professional, leader, and entrepreneur with global experience in security and privacy issues related to network, cloud, mobile, and software including critical information infrastructure protection among others.  In his work with international government and private sector organizations over the years, leading the Nortel’s CTO Security area, and as part of Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing group, Matt has shown thought leadership in some of the emerging technology areas such as cloud computing, voice over IP and multimedia communication, and mobile security.  Matt holds an MBA from Ottawa University and a B.Sc. in Computer Science and Psychology from University of Toronto.

Stephanie Perrin

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Stephanie Perrin spent 30 years in the Canadian federal government, working on information policy and privacy issues.  She was Director of Privacy Policy responsible developing  private sector privacy legislation (PIPEDA), leaving in 2000 to work for Zero Knowledge Systems, to promote technology for anonymity on the Internet.

She is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto Faculty of Information, with research interests focusing on why privacy is not implemented in Internet standards and functions.  She is a member of the Expert Working Group at ICANN, tasked with revamping the Whois directory, and her research examines why privacy has developed into such an intractable problem at ICANN.  This research examines concepts of identity online, and the inadequacy of current privacy norms.

Marcel Labelle CPA, CA, CISSP, CISA, CGEIT, CRISC

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Mr Labelle is a seasoned professional in IT security, risk management, compliance, computer and internal audits. He has more than 30 years of experience in professional services and the last 17 years as partner for large accounting firm. He was leading the Quebec security practice (more than thirty people). He led the creation and management of important security programs, development of governance and security frameworks, security assessments (under ISO 27002, COBIT and other reference frameworks), evaluation and implementation of security solutions, security and control reviews for systems under development or in operation and issuing security and control attestation reports (PCI, SOX, NERC, 5970 / SAS70), for large and medium-sized companies.

 

WIE PANEL

Khadija Baker

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Khadija Baker is a multi-disciplinary artist of Kurdish – Syrian descent living in Montreal, since 2001. Her installations investigate social and political themes centered on the uncertainty of home as it relates to persecution, identity, displacement, and memory. These unsettled feelings of home are a part of her own experience. Through participative storytelling her artwork aims to create active spaces of participation, to promote empathy and understanding.

Khadija was born and educated in the town of Amoude, Syria.  She studied Interior Design, receiving a Master’s degree in 1999 from the University of Damascus, Syria. She had a BFA in Studio Arts from Concordia University/ painting & drawing, and completed her MFA/Open Media at the same university 2012.Her work has garnered many awards and scholarships, including the Millennium Scholarship at Concordia University (2005 & 2006).

Most recently, in 2009-2010, she received the Vivacité grant for culturally diverse artists from the Conseil des arts et des letters du Québec, a Vidéographe research and experimentation grant, and the Joyce Melville Memorial Scholarship in 2011.  She received grants from Canada Council of the Arts, in 2011 and 2012. Khadija has exhibited in cultural capitals such as Montreal, Toronto, New York, London, Berlin, Marseille, New Delhi, Beirut and Damascus.  She presented her most recent work at the 18th biennale of Sydney, Australia, 2012.

Dr. Milica Popovich

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Prof. Milica Popovich received her PhD at Norwestern University (EE, 2001). Since 2001, she has been with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at McGill University, where she currently holds associate professorship.  Her teaching experience includes courses on electromagnetic fields, electrical measurements and antennas and propagation. Her research interests lie, in large part, in biomedical applications of electromagnetic theory. In particular, she and her research team are striving to develop a novel breast tissue monitor based on low-power microwave emissions. The goal of this exciting work is to provide an affordable, safe and comfortable tool which can complement current technologies used for breast cancer detection.

Dr. Sabine Bergler

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Sabine Bergler is a full Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Concordia University. She holds a Ph.D. from the Computer Science Department at Brandeis University. Her research in computational linguistics includes sentiment and emotion analysis, speculative language and negation. She is part of the recent IMMERSE network for game immersion and SpokenWeb 2.0: developing digital archives for spoken word resources.

Dr. Kristina Pitula

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Kristina Pitula holds a PhD in Computer Science and Software Engineering from Concordia University,  Montreal, where she is currently an affiliate assistant professor. She also works as a consultant in software requirements elicitation and human factors design. Prior to undertaking her PhD studies, she worked in the software industry for 15 years (CRIM, BNR/Nortel, Speechworks/Nuance Communications), in areas such as artificial intelligence, speech recognition, human factors and software requirements. Before that, she worked as a volunteer in Africa for 6 years, as a graphical artist and high school teacher in various rural locations. In her current research, she combines her academic and personal interests and professional experience to investigate how “underprivileged” people can benefit from Information and Communication Technologies. Her particular focus is on the design of smartphone apps to meet the needs of non-technical, low-literacy populations.

OPENING CEREMONY D1.5: Gala Reception & Panel

Moderator: Ashley Good

Chris Fabian

Ray Larsen

Roberto DeMarca

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J. Roberto de Marca was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Southern California, where he earned a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering. He has been in the faculty of the Catholic University, Rio de Janeiro (PUC/Rio), since 1978 where he has held several leadership and administrative positions including Associate Academic Vice President for Sponsored Research. Twice on leave, Dr. de Marca served as Scientific Consultant with AT&T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Politecnico di Torino and more recently he was a Visiting Professor at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology and a Guest Scientist at the NEC Europe Research Labs, Heidelberg, Germany.

He was founding President of the Brazilian Telecommunications Society and in 1990, Prof. de Marca was appointed Scientific Director of the Brazilian National Research Council (CNPq) where he approved the initial funding of the national research network that opened the way for the widespread use of Internet in Brazil. He was a delegate to several ITU-R TG8/1 meetings, also chair of a working group on QoS, where the wireless 3G technology specifications were developed. From 2009 to 2011 he was a member of FINEP’s (the largest Brazilian R&D and Innovation funding agency) Presidential Advisory Board.

He is an IEEE Fellow and a full member of both the Brazilian Academy of Sciences and Brazilian National Academy of Engineering. Dr. de Marca was the 2000-2001 President of the IEEE Communications Society. In 2008 he held the office of IEEE Vice President of Technical Activities. He is the current IEEE President and CEO.

J. Roberto de Marca was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Southern California, where he earned a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering. He has been in the faculty of the Catholic University, Rio de Janeiro (PUC/Rio), since 1978 where he has held several leadership and administrative positions including Associate Academic Vice President for Sponsored Research. Twice on leave, Dr. de Marca served as Scientific Consultant with AT&T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Politecnico di Torino and more recently he was a Visiting Professor at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology and a Guest Scientist at the NEC Europe Research Labs, Heidelberg, Germany.

He was founding President of the Brazilian Telecommunications Society and in 1990, Prof. de Marca was appointed Scientific Director of the Brazilian National Research Council (CNPq) where he approved the initial funding of the national research network that opened the way for the widespread use of Internet in Brazil. He was a delegate to several ITU-R TG8/1 meetings, also chair of a working group on QoS, where the wireless 3G technology specifications were developed. From 2009 to 2011 he was a member of FINEP’s (the largest Brazilian R&D& Innovation funding agency) Presidential Advisory Board.

He is an IEEE Fellow and a full member of both the Brazilian Academy of Sciences and Brazilian National Academy of Engineering. Dr. de Marca was the 2000-2001 President of the IEEE Communications Society. In 2008 he held the office of IEEE Vice President of Technical Activities. He was elected as 2013 IEEE President Elect and serve as President and CEO of IEEE in 2014. He has received several national and international recognitions for his professional and volunteer activities.

​In 2009, he was the co-chair of IEEE’s Humanitarian ​Technology Challenge (2009), a joint venture between the IEEE, the United Nations Foundation and Vodafone Foundation.